March 12, 2013

Scenario Fodder: March 12

Patrick Marren
Partner

Your breakfast of scenario planning fodder is served.

March 12 through history, to tickle your scenario-planning fancy:

1689: The Williamite War begins in Ireland, with the arrival of deposed King James II at the port of Kinsale, County Cork (now famous for some mighty fine seafood restaurants), with 6,000 French troops, seeking to regain his crown. Ultimately the war prompts the moving national poem some of us learned from the Sisters of Charity of the Blessed Virgin Mary that began with the stirring refrain: "Up the long ladder and down the short rope/To hell with King Billy and God bless the Pope..." Which is ironic, since Pope Innocent XI had lent William of Orange 150,000 scudi for his campaign to subdue Ireland.

1894: Coca-Cola is bottled and sold for the first time in Vicksburg, MS, 31 years after Grant conquered the city.

1930: Mohandas K. Gandhi begins his Salt March, a 200-mile march to the sea to protest the British salt monopoly in India. He will march for 24 days and his civil disobedience of gathering salt at the seaside will foster an ultimately successful effort to achieve Indian independence. (What is it with the Brits and the tablestuffs? You'd think they'd have learned from us with the tea.)

1947: Former Naval Person Winston Churchill dies after a long career as a military officer and respected writer. Not the one you are thinking of: this is the (at one time pre-eminent) American novelist and U.S. Naval Academy grad and naval officer, who was initially much better known than the other Winston. The British Churchill sent a letter to the American, suggesting that he, the British Winston, would sign his writings "Winston S. Churchill," to avoid confusion with the man who was at the time, in the late 1890s, far more famous, as a writer and in general, than the British Churchill. 

(Source: Wikipedia)

Thoughts?